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Long Term Conditions

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A novel exploration of the support needs of people initiating insulin pump therapy using a social network approach: a longitudinal mixed‐methods study

A social network approach determined what resources and support people with diabetes require when incorporating a new health technology. Visualisation of support networks using concentric circles enabled people to consider and mobilise support and engage in new activities as their needs changed. The novelty of pump therapy creates new illness‐related work, but mobilisation of personally valued flexible, tailored support can improve the process of adaptation.

C. Reidy, C. Foster, A. Rogers - October 16 2019
External web link - https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/dme.14155

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Mediating engagement in a social network intervention for people living with a long-term condition: A qualitative study of the role of facilitation.
James E, Kennedy A, Vassilev I, Ellis J, Rogers A - March 2020

Abstract
Successful facilitation of patient-centred interventions for self-management support has traditionally focussed on individual behaviour change. A social network approach to self-management support implicates the need for facilitation that includes an orientation to connecting to and mobilizing support and resources from other people and the local environment.
External web link - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/32162435

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Self-management in older people living with cancer and multi-morbidity: A systematic review and synthesis of qualitative studies

Teresa Corbett, Amanda Cummings, Lynn Calman, Naomi Farrington, Vicky Fenerty, Claire Foster, Alison Richardson, Theresa Wiseman, Jackie Bridges - June 2020

Abstract

Objective: Many older people with cancer live with multimorbidity. Little is understood about the cumulative impact of old age, cancer and multi-morbidity on self-management. This qualitative systematic review and synthesis aimed to identify what influences self-management from the perspective of older adults living with cancer and multi-morbidity.

External web link - https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/epdf/10.1002/pon.5453

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Planning and optimising CHAT&PLAN: A conversation-based intervention to promote person-centred care for older people living with multimorbidity

Corbett, T., Cummings, A., Lee, K., Calman, L., Fenerty, V., Farrington, N., Lewis, L., Young, A., Boddington, H., Wiseman, T., Richardson, A., Foster, C., Bridges, J. - October 16, 2020

Background

Older people are more likely to be living with cancer and multiple long-term conditions, but their needs, preferences for treatments, health priorities and lifestyle are often not identified or well-understood. There is a need to move towards a more comprehensive person-centred approach to care that focuses on the cumulative impact of a number of conditions on daily activities and quality of life. This paper describes the intervention planning process for CHAT& PLANTM, a structured conversation intervention to promote personalised care and support self-management in older adults with complex conditions.

External web link - https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0240516

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A randomised controlled feasibility trial of E-health application supported care vs usual care after exacerbation of COPD: the RESCUE trial

Mal North, Simon Bourne, Ben Green, Anoop J. Chauhan, Tom Brown, Jonathan Winter, Tom Jones, Dan Neville, Alison Blythin, Alastair Watson, Matthew Johnson, David Culliford, Jack Elkes, Victoria Cornelius & Professor Tom M. A. Wilkinson – October 2020

Abstract

Exacerbations of COPD are one of the commonest causes of admission and readmission to hospital. The role of digital interventions to support self-management in improving outcomes is uncertain. We conducted an open, randomised controlled trial of a digital health platform application (app) in 41 COPD patients recruited following hospital admission with an acute exacerbation. Subjects were randomised to either receive usual care, including a written self-management plan (n = 21), or the myCOPD app (n = 20) for 90 days.

External web link - https://www.nature.com/articles/s41746-020-00347-7